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Honeymoon trip in May, 1996 to Scotland. We began the journey with a few days in London, the took the bullet train to Edinburgh, a quick three hour ride. After couple of days touring Edinburgh Castle, Arthur’s Seat, St. Giles Church, and the splendid Wm. Mathers and Sons pub,we rented a car and drove from Edinburgh to Glencoe. A short drive south along Loch Line to the port town of Oban is where we took a ferry to the Isle of Mull then a bus ride to another ferry across tot he ancient Iona Abbey and Nunnery one of the oldest Christian religious centers in Western Europe. The abbey was a focal point for the spread of Christianity throughout Scotland and marks the foundation of a monastic community by St. Columba, when Iona was part of the Kingdom of Dál Riata. Saint Aidan served as a monk at Iona, before helping to reestablish Christianity in Northumberland, on the island of Lindisfarne.
On the return drive to Glencoe there was an astounding sunset over Loch Line and the 14th century Castle Stalker near the town of Appin. The new day we drove on to another ferry from Mallaig across open sea to the Isle of Skye where we visited Dunvegan Castle, ancient cemeteries and vast landscapes of the Cuillin Hills. Crossing back to the mainland and north to Inverness, Nairn and Findhorn, coastal towns and beaches and a tour and forest hike around Cawdor Castle. South to Grantown-on Spey, the famous fly fishing river Spey. On south again through verdant green landscapes, the Cairngorm National Park hills in the distance. Further south we found the intriguing Rumbling Bridge and a short hike to a viewing point of the double arched bridge. The Devon river is crossed by two bridges built one above the other. The lower of the two bridges, 24.3m (80 feet) above the bed of the river, was built in 1713. A later crossing was built 36.5m (120 feet) above the Devon in 1816.
After a side-trip to the town of Crieff for purchasing lead crystal cut glassware we stopped at the Dunfermline A
Copyright
© Jay Mather 1996
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4500x3071 / 39.6MB
Contained in galleries
Honeymoon trip in May, 1996 to Scotland. We began the journey with a few days in London, the took the bullet train to Edinburgh, a quick three hour ride. After couple of days touring Edinburgh Castle, Arthur’s Seat, St. Giles Church, and the splendid Wm. Mathers and Sons pub,we rented a car and drove from Edinburgh to Glencoe. A short drive south along Loch Line to the port town of Oban is where we took a ferry to the Isle of Mull then a bus ride to another ferry across tot he ancient Iona Abbey and Nunnery  one of the oldest Christian religious centers in Western Europe. The abbey was a focal point for the spread of Christianity throughout Scotland and marks the foundation of a monastic community by St. Columba, when Iona was part of the Kingdom of Dál Riata. Saint Aidan served as a monk at Iona, before helping to reestablish Christianity in Northumberland, on the island of Lindisfarne.<br />
On the return drive to Glencoe there was an astounding sunset over Loch Line and the 14th century Castle Stalker near the town of Appin. The new day we drove on to another ferry from Mallaig across open sea to the Isle of Skye where we visited Dunvegan Castle, ancient cemeteries and vast landscapes of the Cuillin Hills. Crossing back to the mainland and north to Inverness, Nairn and Findhorn, coastal towns and beaches and a tour and forest hike around Cawdor Castle. South to Grantown-on Spey, the famous fly fishing river Spey. On south again through verdant green landscapes, the Cairngorm National Park hills in the distance. Further south we found the intriguing Rumbling Bridge and a short hike to a viewing point of the double arched bridge. The Devon river is crossed by two bridges built one above the other. The lower of the two bridges, 24.3m (80 feet) above the bed of the river, was built in 1713. A later crossing was built 36.5m (120 feet) above the Devon in 1816.<br />
After a side-trip to the town of Crieff for purchasing lead crystal cut glassware we stopped at the Dunfermline A